READ 180 Universal
Study: Hamilton et al. (2011)

Summary

READ 180 is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4—12+. Originally developed by Dr. Ted Hasselbring and his team at Vanderbilt University and later implemented as part of the Orange County Literacy Project in Orange County Public Schools, READ 180 integrates the key principles of cognition and learning with the best practices for instructional effectiveness for older struggling readers. Since READ 180’s launch of the program 19 years ago, READ 180 has become one of the most thoroughly researched and documented programs used in classrooms today. It meets the most stringent standards for research put forth by the What Works Clearinghouse and Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Data Driven Reform in Education. The READ 180 instructional model facilitates a blended model of instruction with clear organization for the classroom. Studies have conclusively shown that when schools implement and follow the Instructional Model, significant gains can be expected after one or two years of program participation. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. Respectful of students of all ages, READ 180 is available in three Stages each with rigorous, age-appropriate content: Stage A (Grades 4—6), Stage B (Grades 6—8), and Stage C (Grades 9 and Up).

Target Grades:
4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Target Populations:
  • Students with disabilities only
  • Students with learning disabilities
  • Students with emotional or behavioral disabilities
  • English language learners
  • Any student at risk for academic failure
Area(s) of Focus:
  • Phonological awareness
  • Phonics/word study
  • Comprehension
  • Fluency
  • Vocabulary
  • Spelling
  • Spelling
  • Sentence construction
  • Planning and revising
Where to Obtain:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
125 High Street, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02110-2777
888-918-6158
www.hmhco.com/read180
Initial Cost:
Contact vendor for pricing details.
Replacement Cost:
Contact vendor for pricing details.

READ 180 Universal Stages A, B and C is a blended subscription model. As a blended instructional subscription model, READ 180 Universal includes a teacher subscription, student subscription, classroom materials and implementation best practice services. The READ 180 Universal student subscription includes the student application, a student book (ReaL book) and our HMH hosting services. The teacher subscription includes access to the READ180 Universal Teacher Central Application. The classroom materials consist of paperbacks, audiobooks, ebooks and teacher resources for differentiation of instruction. The READ 180 Universal purchase is supported with wrap round implementation best practices consisting of getting started for new teachers, in-person and virtual coaching, reporting and data analytics. Cost varies based on purchase and depends upon number of intervention students, classrooms, and intervention teachers.

Staff Qualified to Administer Include:
  • Special Education Teacher
  • General Education Teacher
  • Reading Specialist
  • Math Specialist
  • EL Specialist
  • Interventionist
  • Student Support Services Personnel (e.g., counselor, social worker, school psychologist, etc.)
Training Requirements:
2 days of training

Scholastic provides comprehensive professional development in person and online. Scholastic provides two-and-a-half days of in-person professional development with the purchase of a complete Stage of READ 180. Scholastic will meet with school or district teams to develop a personalized plan that best suits their needs. Embedded professional development resources With READ 180, teachers receive daily professional development resources. Short, targeted videos, resources, and presentations providing strategies tied to that day’s instruction are available on the Teacher Dashboard and ITS, enabling teachers to engage in professional learning minutes before beginning to teach and at point-of-use. A collection of professional development strategies is embedded within all of the teacher’s materials. Additional resources exist for READ 180 teachers Scholastic U, an online professional development destination for PreK– 12 teachers and leaders, includes thousands of just-in-time learning resources, 20 graduate-level courses, access to collaborative online learning communities, and more. The purchase of READ 180 includes a one-year subscription to the online course Best Practices in Reading Intervention. http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/ScholasticU/ The READ 180 Community Website connects educators with peers from across the country. It provides personalized social networking tools, downloadable resources, and the ability to share resources and media. www.read180.com/community.


READ 180 training materials and teacher implementation guides are reviewed by expert Scholastic consultants and field-tested in dozens of pilot sites to ensure that the content and strategies are practical and best support teachers and students with successful implementation. The consultants who review and field test the materials bring knowledge and expertise from working side-by-side with READ 180 teachers and leaders in classrooms and schools across the country.

Access to Technical Support:
Additional Training available: • Coordinator Training provides leaders with the skills to manage, monitor, and support READ 180 at the building and/or district level. • Certified Support Specialist Training enables districts and schools to build internal staff resources that can lead and support ongoing READ 180 implementation fidelity and professional development. • In-Classroom Support focuses on classroom set-up, implementation level, instructional coaching, and data interpretation. These side-by-side sessions with Scholastic consultants take place within the classroom and are based on district, school, and/or teacher needs. • Scholastic Training Zone o The Scholastic Training Zone (STZ) is an online destination that provides anytime/anywhere access to online resources to support your Scholastic implementation. Resources include video tutorials and downloadable classroom resources for teachers and leaders, along with live online webinar trainings and exclusive online author events. • Scholastic U o Scholastic U Online Professional Development builds capacity to deliver breadth and depth of professional learning in literacy, leadership, and instructional excellence.
Recommended Administration Formats Include:
  • Individual students
  • Small group of students
Minimum Number of Minutes Per Session:
90
Minimum Number of Sessions Per Week:
5
Minimum Number of Weeks:
Detailed Implementation Manual or Instructions Available:
Yes
Is Technology Required?
  • Computer or tablet
  • Internet connection

Program Information

Descriptive Information

Please provide a description of program, including intended use:

READ 180 is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4—12+. Originally developed by Dr. Ted Hasselbring and his team at Vanderbilt University and later implemented as part of the Orange County Literacy Project in Orange County Public Schools, READ 180 integrates the key principles of cognition and learning with the best practices for instructional effectiveness for older struggling readers. Since READ 180’s launch of the program 19 years ago, READ 180 has become one of the most thoroughly researched and documented programs used in classrooms today. It meets the most stringent standards for research put forth by the What Works Clearinghouse and Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Data Driven Reform in Education. The READ 180 instructional model facilitates a blended model of instruction with clear organization for the classroom. Studies have conclusively shown that when schools implement and follow the Instructional Model, significant gains can be expected after one or two years of program participation. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. Respectful of students of all ages, READ 180 is available in three Stages each with rigorous, age-appropriate content: Stage A (Grades 4—6), Stage B (Grades 6—8), and Stage C (Grades 9 and Up).

The program is intended for use in the following age(s) and/or grade(s).

not selected Age 0-3
not selected Age 3-5
not selected Kindergarten
not selected First grade
not selected Second grade
not selected Third grade
selected Fourth grade
selected Fifth grade
selected Sixth grade
selected Seventh grade
selected Eighth grade
selected Ninth grade
selected Tenth grade
selected Eleventh grade
selected Twelth grade


The program is intended for use with the following groups.

selected Students with disabilities only
selected Students with learning disabilities
not selected Students with intellectual disabilities
selected Students with emotional or behavioral disabilities
selected English language learners
selected Any student at risk for academic failure
not selected Any student at risk for emotional and/or behavioral difficulties
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

ACADEMIC INTERVENTION: Please indicate the academic area of focus.

Early Literacy

not selected Print knowledge/awareness
not selected Alphabet knowledge
not selected Phonological awareness
not selected Phonological awarenessEarly writing
not selected Early decoding abilities
not selected Other

If other, please describe:

Language

not selected Expressive and receptive vocabulary
not selected Grammar
not selected Syntax
not selected Listening comprehension
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

Reading

selected Phonological awareness
selected Phonics/word study
selected Comprehension
selected Fluency
selected Vocabulary
selected Spelling
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

Mathematics

not selected Computation
not selected Concepts and/or word problems
not selected Whole number arithmetic
not selected Comprehensive: Includes computation/procedures, problem solving, and mathematical concepts
not selected Algebra
not selected Fractions, decimals (rational number)
not selected Geometry and measurement
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

Writing

not selected Handwriting
selected Spelling
selected Sentence construction
selected Planning and revising
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION: Please indicate the behavior area of focus.

Externalizing Behavior

not selected Physical Aggression
not selected Verbal Threats
not selected Property Destruction
not selected Noncompliance
not selected High Levels of Disengagement
not selected Disruptive Behavior
not selected Social Behavior (e.g., Peer interactions, Adult interactions)
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

Internalizing Behavior

not selected Depression
not selected Anxiety
not selected Social Difficulties (e.g., withdrawal)
not selected School Phobia
not selected Other
If other, please describe:

Acquisition and cost information

Where to obtain:

Address
125 High Street, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02110-2777
Phone Number
888-918-6158
Website
www.hmhco.com/read180

Initial cost for implementing program:

Cost
Unit of cost

Replacement cost per unit for subsequent use:

Cost
Unit of cost
Duration of license

Additional cost information:

Describe basic pricing plan and structure of the program. Also, provide information on what is included in the published program, as well as what is not included but required for implementation (e.g., computer and/or internet access)

READ 180 Universal Stages A, B and C is a blended subscription model. As a blended instructional subscription model, READ 180 Universal includes a teacher subscription, student subscription, classroom materials and implementation best practice services. The READ 180 Universal student subscription includes the student application, a student book (ReaL book) and our HMH hosting services. The teacher subscription includes access to the READ180 Universal Teacher Central Application. The classroom materials consist of paperbacks, audiobooks, ebooks and teacher resources for differentiation of instruction. The READ 180 Universal purchase is supported with wrap round implementation best practices consisting of getting started for new teachers, in-person and virtual coaching, reporting and data analytics. Cost varies based on purchase and depends upon number of intervention students, classrooms, and intervention teachers.

Program Specifications

Setting for which the program is designed.

selected Individual students
selected Small group of students
not selected BI ONLY: A classroom of students

If group-delivered, how many students compose a small group?

   5-6

Program administration time

Minimum number of minutes per session
90
Minimum number of sessions per week
5
Minimum number of weeks
not selected N/A (implemented until effective)

If intervention program is intended to occur over less frequently than 60 minutes a week for approximately 8 weeks, justify the level of intensity:

Does the program include highly specified teacher manuals or step by step instructions for implementation?
Yes

BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION: Is the program affiliated with a broad school- or class-wide management program?

If yes, please identify and describe the broader school- or class-wide management program:

Does the program require technology?
Yes

If yes, what technology is required to implement your program?
selected Computer or tablet
selected Internet connection
not selected Other technology (please specify)

If your program requires additional technology not listed above, please describe the required technology and the extent to which it is combined with teacher small-group instruction/intervention:
READ 180 is a blended instructional model, where a third of the class is on the computer during the small group rotations. Therefore, the number of computer depends on the number of students in the READ 180 classroom.

Training

How many people are needed to implement the program ?

Is training for the instructor or interventionist required?
Yes
If yes, is the necessary training free or at-cost?
Free

Describe the time required for instructor or interventionist training:
2 days of training

Describe the format and content of the instructor or interventionist training:
Scholastic provides comprehensive professional development in person and online. Scholastic provides two-and-a-half days of in-person professional development with the purchase of a complete Stage of READ 180. Scholastic will meet with school or district teams to develop a personalized plan that best suits their needs. Embedded professional development resources With READ 180, teachers receive daily professional development resources. Short, targeted videos, resources, and presentations providing strategies tied to that day’s instruction are available on the Teacher Dashboard and ITS, enabling teachers to engage in professional learning minutes before beginning to teach and at point-of-use. A collection of professional development strategies is embedded within all of the teacher’s materials. Additional resources exist for READ 180 teachers Scholastic U, an online professional development destination for PreK– 12 teachers and leaders, includes thousands of just-in-time learning resources, 20 graduate-level courses, access to collaborative online learning communities, and more. The purchase of READ 180 includes a one-year subscription to the online course Best Practices in Reading Intervention. http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/ScholasticU/ The READ 180 Community Website connects educators with peers from across the country. It provides personalized social networking tools, downloadable resources, and the ability to share resources and media. www.read180.com/community.

What types or professionals are qualified to administer your program?

selected Special Education Teacher
selected General Education Teacher
selected Reading Specialist
selected Math Specialist
selected EL Specialist
selected Interventionist
selected Student Support Services Personnel (e.g., counselor, social worker, school psychologist, etc.)
not selected Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapist or Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA)
not selected Paraprofessional
not selected Other

If other, please describe:

Does the program assume that the instructor or interventionist has expertise in a given area?
No   

If yes, please describe: 


Are training manuals and materials available?
Yes

Describe how the training manuals or materials were field-tested with the target population of instructors or interventionist and students:
READ 180 training materials and teacher implementation guides are reviewed by expert Scholastic consultants and field-tested in dozens of pilot sites to ensure that the content and strategies are practical and best support teachers and students with successful implementation. The consultants who review and field test the materials bring knowledge and expertise from working side-by-side with READ 180 teachers and leaders in classrooms and schools across the country.

Do you provide fidelity of implementation guidance such as a checklist for implementation in your manual?

Can practitioners obtain ongoing professional and technical support?
Yes

If yes, please specify where/how practitioners can obtain support:

Additional Training available: • Coordinator Training provides leaders with the skills to manage, monitor, and support READ 180 at the building and/or district level. • Certified Support Specialist Training enables districts and schools to build internal staff resources that can lead and support ongoing READ 180 implementation fidelity and professional development. • In-Classroom Support focuses on classroom set-up, implementation level, instructional coaching, and data interpretation. These side-by-side sessions with Scholastic consultants take place within the classroom and are based on district, school, and/or teacher needs. • Scholastic Training Zone o The Scholastic Training Zone (STZ) is an online destination that provides anytime/anywhere access to online resources to support your Scholastic implementation. Resources include video tutorials and downloadable classroom resources for teachers and leaders, along with live online webinar trainings and exclusive online author events. • Scholastic U o Scholastic U Online Professional Development builds capacity to deliver breadth and depth of professional learning in literacy, leadership, and instructional excellence.

Summary of Evidence Base

Please identify, to the best of your knowledge, all the research studies that have been conducted to date supporting the efficacy of your program, including studies currently or previously submitted to NCII for review. Please provide citations only (in APA format); do not include any descriptive information on these studies. NCII staff will also conduct a search to confirm that the list you provide is accurate.

Study Information

Study Citations

Hamilton, J., Meisch, A., Chen, E., Quintanilla, P., Fong, P., Gray-Adams, K., Petta, I. & Thornton, N. (2011). Striving Readers Study: Targeted and Whole School Interventions – Year 4.

Participants Full Bobble

Describe how students were selected to participate in the study:
For students to be eligible, they had to be enrolled in grades 6, 7, or 8 in one of the 19 participating middle schools in Newark NJ. In addition, students had to be identified as a struggling reader. This identification was based on the students’ spring (pretest) reading score of the state assessment, the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJASK). Students with scores one standard deviation or more below the norm were eligible. (Citation; pages 5-7.)

Describe how students were identified as being at risk for academic failure (AI) or as having emotional or behavioral difficulties (BI):
Students scoring below 1 standard deviation of the district norm on the reading subtest of the state assessment were identified as being at risk for academic failure. This criterion resulted in cutoff scores that ensured that all students were identified by the state as “partially proficient”, which is the lowest category possible on the state assessment.

ACADEMIC INTERVENTION: What percentage of participants were at risk, as measured by one or more of the following criteria:
  • below the 30th percentile on local or national norm, or
  • identified disability related to the focus of the intervention?
%

BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION: What percentage of participants were at risk, as measured by one or more of the following criteria:
  • emotional disability label,
  • placed in an alternative school/classroom,
  • non-responsive to Tiers 1 and 2, or
  • designation of severe problem behaviors on a validated scale or through observation?
%

Specify which condition is the submitted intervention:
Read 180 (Enterprise Edition) is the treatment for this evaluation.

Specify which condition is the control condition:
The control condition implemented the “business as usual” district language arts curriculum. The control condition used the New Jersey Core Content Curriculum Standards for literacy instruction. (Citation: pages 1-3)

If you have a third, competing condition, in addition to your control and intervention condition, identify what the competing condition is (data from this competing condition will not be used):

Using the tables that follow, provide data demonstrating comparability of the program group and control group in terms of demographics.

Grade Level

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
Age less than 1
Age 1
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Age 5
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6 905 782 0.00
Grade 7 839 756 0.00
Grade 8 805 700 0.00
Grade 9
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12

Race–Ethnicity

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
African American 1377 1288 0.07
American Indian
Asian/Pacific Islander
Hispanic 1108 915 0.07
White
Other

Socioeconomic Status

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
Subsidized Lunch 1761 1495 0.05
No Subsidized Lunch

Disability Status

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
Speech-Language Impairments
Learning Disabilities
Behavior Disorders
Emotional Disturbance
Intellectual Disabilities
Other
Not Identified With a Disability

ELL Status

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
English Language Learner 266 182 0.15
Not English Language Learner

Gender

Demographic Program
Number
Control
Number
Effect Size: Cox Index
for Binary Differences
Female
Male 1477 1241 0.05

Mean Effect Size

0.05

For any substantively (e.g., effect size ≥ 0.25 for pretest or demographic differences) or statistically significant (e.g., p < 0.05) pretest differences between groups in the descriptions below, please describe the extent to which these differences are related to the impact of the treatment. For example, if analyses were conducted to determine that outcomes from this study are due to the intervention and not demographic characteristics, please describe the results of those analyses here.

Design Full Bobble

What method was used to determine students' placement in treatment/control groups?
Random
Please describe the assignment method or the process for defining treatment/comparison groups.
The schools eligible to participate in the Striving Readers program were randomly assigned to either the intervention or a control condition in May 2006 (see Section 1.C.1.2 for school eligibility requirements). The targeted evaluation is, therefore, a randomized cluster design; no classroom- or student-level random assignment was involved. Although randomly assigning students would be the most statistically efficient design, it was not feasible for this study. One of the main constraints was the cost of implementation, which is largely determined by the number of participating schools. Additionally, there are contamination and spillover effects associated with student-level randomization. For example, teachers are likely to be aware that a colleague is delivering a special intervention, and this awareness may influence their behavior. Additionally, intervention and nonintervention students would interact, possibly closing the gap between their differences. In either case, the impact estimates would be biased toward zero.

What was the unit of assignment?
Schools
If other, please specify:

Please describe the unit of assignment:

What unit(s) were used for primary data analysis?
selected Schools
not selected Teachers
not selected Students
not selected Classes
not selected Other
If other, please specify:

Please describe the unit(s) used for primary data analysis:

Fidelity of Implementation Empty Bobble

How was the program delivered?
selected Individually
selected Small Group
not selected Classroom

If small group, answer the following:

Average group size
21
Minimum group size
Maximum group size

What was the duration of the intervention (If duration differed across participants, settings, or behaviors, describe for each.)?

Weeks
Sessions per week
5.00
Duration of sessions in minutes
90.00
What were the background, experience, training, and ongoing support of the instructors or interventionists?
Teachers were provided with training on the use of the curriculum. In addition, teachers received ongoing coaching and feedback, related to fidelity and quality of implementation, by trained district resource teacher coordinators.

Describe when and how fidelity of treatment information was obtained.
No classroom observations were conducted. Extant data were used to measure fidelity of implementation. Four components were measured: (1) teacher attendance at training, (2) class size, (3) the frequency of ongoing assessment (number of SRI administrations), and (4) the duration and frequency of use of the instructional software. Data for the first two components were obtained from district records. Data for the last two components were obtained from software usage reports. Because these data were extant, the calculation of inter-rater reliability is impossible (i.e. multiple raters were not used). Moreover the use of extant data provides objective and reliable indicators of fidelity.

What were the results on the fidelity-of-treatment implementation measure?
Each treatment classroom (n=21) receives a fidelity rating for each of the four components described above. The fidelity ratings range from 1 (low fidelity) to 4 (high fidelity). These components are then combined into an overall school-level fidelity score. Data for each fidelity component is provided below. 1. Teacher attendance at training- 40% of new teachers in year 4 were categorized as having ‘full participation’. The remaining 60% of teachers had ‘moderate participation’ (Note: there are only 3 categories for fidelity in this component due to the maximum number of training days) 2. 100% of treatment classrooms had fewer than 21 students, resulting in a fidelity level of ‘high’ for this component for all classrooms. 3. 100% of treatment classrooms administered a minimum of 3 SRI assessments during year 4, resulting in a fidelity level of ‘high’ in this component for all classrooms. 4. The duration of use of instructional software has two sub-components; the number of sessions per week, and the duration (in minutes) of each session. Software must be used a minimum of three times a week for 15 minutes each time for a classroom to receive a ‘high’ fidelity rating. 71% of classrooms received a ‘low’ rating for this component. 19% received a ‘low-to-moderate’ rating. 1% received a ‘moderate-to-high’ rating. No classroom received a ‘high’ fidelity rating. For the school-level overall fidelity scores, 40% of schools received a ‘high’ rating and the rest received ‘moderate-to-high’.

Was the fidelity measure also used in control classrooms?

Measures and Results

Measures Targeted : Dash
Measures Broader : Full Bobble

Study measures are classified as targeted, broader, or administrative data according to the following definitions:

  • Targeted measures
    Assess outcomes, such as competencies or skills that the program was directly targeted to improve.
    • In the academic domain, targeted measures typically are not the very items taught but rather novel items structured similarly to the content addressed in the program. For example, if a program taught word-attack skills, a targeted measure would be decoding of pseudo words. If a program taught comprehension of cause-effect passages, a targeted measure would be answering questions about cause-effect passages structured similarly to those used during intervention, but not including the very passages used for intervention.
    • In the behavioral domain, targeted measures evaluate aspects of external or internal behavior the program was directly targeted to improve and are operationally defined.
  • Broader measures
    Assess outcomes that are related to the competencies or skills targeted by the program but not directly taught in the program.
    • In the academic domain, if a program taught word-level reading skill, a broader measure would be answering questions about passages the student reads. If a program taught calculation skill, a broader measure would be solving word problems that require the same kinds of calculation skill taught in the program.
    • In the behavioral domain, if a program taught a specific skill like on-task behavior in one classroom, a broader measure would be academic performance in that setting or on-task behavior in another setting.
  • Administrative data measures apply only to behavioral intervention tools and are measures such as office discipline referrals (ODRs) and graduation rates which do not have psychometric properties as do other, more traditional targeted or broader measures.

Click here for more information on effect size.


What populations are you submitting outcome data for?
selected Full sample
not selected Students at or below the 20th percentile
not selected English language learners
not selected Racial/ethnic subgroups
not selected Economically disadvantaged students (low socioeconomic status)
Targeted Measure Reverse Coded? Reliability Relevance Exposure
Broader Measure Reverse Coded? Reliability Relevance Exposure
Administrative Data Measure Reverse Coded? Relevance

Posttest Data

Targeted Measures (Full Sample)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P

Broader Measures (Full Sample)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P

Administrative Measures (Full Sample)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P

Targeted Measures (Subgroups)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P

Broader Measures (Subgroups)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P

Administrative Measures (Subgroups)

Measure Sample Type Effect Size P
For any substantively (e.g., effect size ≥ 0.25 for pretest or demographic differences) or statistically significant (e.g., p < 0.05) pretest differences, please describe the extent to which these differences are related to the impact of the treatment. For example, if analyses were conducted to determine that outcomes from this study are due to the intervention and not pretest characteristics, please describe the results of those analyses here.
Please explain any missing data or instances of measures with incomplete pre- or post-test data.
If you have excluded a variable or data that are reported in the study being submitted, explain the rationale for exclusion:
Describe the analyses used to determine whether the intervention produced changes in student outcomes:
To determine the effect of READ 180, an intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis was conducted based on repeated cross-sectional data, using a multilevel software package (HLM). A linear two-level model was used, with student and school as the two levels. Achievement for students within schools was predicted by a series of student and school characteristics. Student covariates were fixed across schools with no interactions (p. 53)

Additional Research

Is the program reviewed by WWC or E-ESSA?
WWC & E-ESSA
Summary of WWC / E-ESSA Findings :

What Works Clearinghouse Review

Adolescent Literacy Evidence Protocol

EffectivenessREAD 180 was found to have potentially positive effects on comprehension and general literacy achievement for adolescent learners.

Studies Reviewed: 9 studies meet standards out of 39 studies total

Full Report

Students with Learning Disabilities Evidence Protocol

Effectiveness: No studies of READ 180® that fall within the scope of the Students with Learning Disabilities review protocol meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) evidence standards. The lack of studies meeting WWC evidence standards means that, at this time, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of READ 180® on students with learning disabilities.

Studies Reviewed: N/A

Full Report

 

Evidence for ESSA

Program Outcomes: Five studies of READ 180 met inclusion standards. Two of these had statistically significant positive effects in comparison to control groups, qualifying READ 180 for the ESSA “Strong” category. These were studies in Western Massachusetts (effect size =+0.18) and Milwaukee (effect size =+0.14). A Florida study found positive outcomes for students at moderate risk, but negative effects for students at high risk, with an average effect size of +0.12. Studies in Newark (NJ) and Memphis found no differences. The average effect size across all studies was a modest +0.08.

Number of Studies: 5

Average Effect Size: 0.08

Full Report

How many additional research studies are potentially eligible for NCII review?
5
Citations for Additional Research Studies :

Interactive Inc. (2002). An efficacy study of READ 180, a print and electronic adaptive intervention program, grades 4 and above. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

Scholastic Research. (2008). Desert Sands Unified School District, CA. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

White, R. N., Haslam, M. B., & Hewes, G. M. (2006). Improving student literacy: READ 180 in the Phoenix Union High School District, 2003–04 and 2004–05. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates.

White, R. N., Williams, I. J., & Haslam, M. B. (2005). Performance of District 23 students participating in Scholastic READ 180. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates.

Woods, D. E. (2007). An investigation of the effects of a middle school reading intervention on school dropout rates. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg.

Disclaimer

Most tools and programs evaluated by the NCII are branded products which have been submitted by the companies, organizations, or individuals that disseminate these products. These entities supply the textual information shown above, but not the ratings accompanying the text. NCII administrators and members of our Technical Review Committees have reviewed the content on this page, but NCII cannot guarantee that this information is free from error or reflective of recent changes to the product. Tools and programs have the opportunity to be updated annually or upon request.